• ee
  • en
  • Biomass – Ghost in the Corner

    13/05/2020 — 30/05/2020

    Kogo Gallery is glad to present the personal exhibition of sculptor and installation artist Eike Eplik, accompanied by Mehis Heinsaar‘s text “Aesthistence” (2020).

    Eike Eplik uses improvisation and experiments with various materials to find new and exciting forms, variations and associations. This time, she creates a gallery-wide installation of objects made of different materials (clay, porcelain, metal, foundry, wood). As art and literature have been closely intertwined in the Tartu cultural field for many years, thus creating both original creators and fascinating collaborations, Kogo gallery proposed to invite one Estonian writer or poet to take part in the exhibition. So Eike Eplik selected Mehis Heinsaare as the partner of the show. The choice is fully justified – both creators are courageous and independent escapists whose oeuvre is based on a deep connection with the environment (nature) and the individualism of the author. Their works are elaborate, imaginative and closely connected to the subconsciousness. Neither creator is directly social or political, but in the undercurrents, these themes are inevitable. Using nature’s motifs, they both create stories that are the worship of pluralism and biodiversity.

    Eike Eplik (1982) has a master’s degree from the Department of Sculpture of the Estonian Academy of Arts (2010). She has also studied in the Pallas University of Applied Sciences and the Turku University of Applied Sciences, Finland. She worked as an assistant to artists in Finland and in Germany and is currently teaching in the Tartu Children’s Art School and the Pallas University of Applied Sciences, Tartu. In 2006, Eplik received the Eduar Wiiralt grant for young artists; in 2012, the production grant of the contemporary art festival ART IST KUKU NU UT; in 2015, she was nominated for the Sadolin Art Award; and in 2018, she was recognised with the Ado Vabbe Art Award. Her latest personal exhibitions were “Beauty Salon” in the monumental gallery of the Tartu Art House (2017) and “Natural” in the Hobusepea Gallery in Tallinn (2018). In 2021, Eike Eplik will hold a personal exhibition in the Tartu Art Museum that also has her works in their collections. More info https://eikeeplik.ee.

    Mehis Heinsaar (1973) is one of the most highly esteemed contemporary Estonian writers. He made his debut as a poet belonging to the literary group Erakkond (The Group of Hermits) in 1997. In 2001, when his first collections of short stories, “Vanameeste näppaja” (Snatcher of Old Men, 2001) and “Härra Pauli kroonikad” (The Chronicles of Mr Paul) appeared, he enjoyed unprecedented success amongst critics and was awarded several prestigious prizes. Since then, he has published numerous impressive short stories and collections. But Heinsaar is still a bewitching poet, too. His second poetry collection, “Pingeväljade aednik” (The Gardener of Tension Fields), appeared in 2018. He also has published one novel and is currently writing the second one. Mehis Heinsaar’s works have been translated to Finnish, Hungarian, Russian, French and English. More info and list of translations http://estlit.ee/elis/?cmd=writer&id=48088&grp=1

    * The interdisciplinary cooperation of the creative people in Tartu was especially visible during 2004–2014 when the Y-Gallery was active. For example creators like Kiwa, chaneldior (Tanel Rander), Martiini, Juka Käärmann, Erkki Luuk, Marko Kompus, Lauri Sommer (Kago), Kaspar Jassa, Kristiina Viin, et al. has made exiting multidisciplinary collaborations. In later years, the cooperation between the sculptor and installation artist Jevgeni Zolotko (from the same generation as Eplik) and the writer, translator and gamer designer Anti Saar is a significant example.

    Thanks to Sculpture department of Pallas University of Applied Sciences, Tartu Children’s Art School, Kertu Tuberg, Mehis Heinsaar, Silver Sikk, Bruno Kadaku, Mary-Ann Talvistu, Peeter Talvistu, Šelda Pukite, Margit Lõhmus, Urmo Teekivi, University of Tartu project practice students, group leader Mari-Liis Koemets and supervisors Anneli Lorenz and Merily Heinalo; the supporters Cultural Endowment of Estonia and the City of Tartu.

    Exhibition views
    Press/Publications
    / 28

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    Text: Mehis Heinsaar “Aesthistence” 2020

    I

    Secretive, scattered, ambiguous states of mind; strange dreams that evade expression in words and seem to not even belong to the “ego” – these may, in and of themselves, be very well-defined deep within and in the shadowy corners of our lives. In relation to our light-dark mood as it plays hide-and-seek with consciousness, they may form into ciliates, lizards, beetles, amoebas, humming residents of spiral shells, sedgelings, water striders, water boatmen, or hybrid forms that fall between plant and insect, thus embarking on their own separate lives.

     

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    Text: Mehis Heinsaar “Aesthistence” 2020

    II

    And if we allow this vague, delicate, and at the same time nightmarishly intense state of mind that carries the unbearable lightness of being to dissolve within us and, in the interests of mental health, be replaced by a practical mindset – one which can, to the delight of the “ego”, effortlessly translate into words and technical acts – even then, the life forms called into being by this bizarre state of mind do not vanish.

     

    III

    They continue taking root in the base layers of our spiritual landscape; continue extending their secret paths within us by burrowing, squirming, and budding. Patterns emerge on the backs of those lizards, hydrozoans, and crustaceans absent from the official fauna catalogs; the intermediate hybrid forms of plants and beetles evolve feelers and corollas that creep along the amoebic wall through the spiritual landscape, searching for moister surfaces upon which to burst into bloom or winding around the legacy trees of DNA like quasi-liana. 

     

     

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    Text: Mehis Heinsaar “Aesthistence” 2020

    IV

    So it may be that the early animal forms this strange state of mind delivers – the lizards, hydras, beetles, and those somewhere between plant and insect – willfully adopt the sub-layers of the human spiritual landscape as their own, enriching and reviving it with their phosphorizing rhizomic roots and eyes; with their excretions and decay; with their composting and pupation; with their refertilization and reproduction; thus permanently sustaining that state of mind within us as a sensory primeval forest of possibility.

    V

    And so, when the day arrives in which that uncomfortable, undefined, and initially so much as unbearable lightness of being again reactivates in our consciousness, we suddenly realize that it is no longer bothersome or oppressing, but now almost seamlessly slides into the life forms that evolved during the earlier era of a strange state of mind – one that has meanwhile, developing independently in the dusky spiritual landscape, preserved, expanded, deepened, and enriched our inner environments with the oxygen of dreams.

     

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    Text: Mehis Heinsaar “Aesthistence” 2020

    VI

    It is therefore quite astonishing that when the strange state of mind becomes real and relevant in the present daylight of our consciousness once again, it no longer inflicts the keen and extremely unpleasant pains of rebirth. Rather, even that becomes light and natural to bear – and not only! The state of mind itself now carries us like a magic carpet, upon which it is strangely pleasant to sit in a state of cheerful silence.

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma

    A view to Eike Eplik’s exhibition “Biomass – Ghost in the Corner”

    Photo: Marje Eelma